A visit to the Jack Roush Collection

The Leland Chapter of the Society of Automotive Historians held a meeting last night at Jack Roush’s private car museum in Livonia, Michigan. Naturally, MCG was there.  

 

First order of business: Are you a member of the Society of Automotive Historians? You probably should be if you have an interest in automotive history and lore. The SAH publishes two fine periodicals, hosts a hospitality tent at the Hershey AACA Fall Meet each year, and offers  a great networking opportunity for folks who share a passion for automotive history. And the dues are reasonable. You can learn more about the SAH and apply for membership here at the Society’s website.

SAH members in the Motor City area can also join the organization’s  Leland Chapter, one of seven regional affiliates around the world. The local chapter is capably led by director John Jendza III—that’s right, the famed Top Hat John—along with associate director Jim Petersen and Secretary/Treasurer/real brains behind the operation Victoria Mobley.

The Leland Chapter people (you can find the chapter’s website here) organize an entire series of great gearhead-related activities for their members throughout the year. Like this one, for example: a visit to the private car collection of Jack Roush, NASCAR team owner and auto industry kingpin. 

 

Fun stuff at last night’s meetup included a picnic-style catered dinner, great musical entertainment by the a capella doo-wop group Full Throttle, and of course, a stroll through Jack’s matchless and priceless collection of vintage Fords and famous Roush race cars. You can see a few of them in the gallery below.

 

Cunningham prototype
Roush Folgers NASCAR Thunderbird Mark Martin
dinner is served
1951 Ford Victoria hardtop
Mustang IMSA GTP
1934 Ford Bohnalite Indy racer recreation
1967 Cougar
1988 Merkur Roush IMSA racer
Big Thunder Falcon NMRA drag car
Roush IRS road racing chassis
Ford Model T Speedster
Roush Pontiac G6
Chad Little Roush NASCAR Thunderbird John Deere
Ford 600 tractor
Boss 604 Mustang
Roush SCCA Spec Racer Ford
Roush Zakspeed Mustang Probe IMSA GT
Roush NASCAR Ford Fusion Irwin Jamie McMurray
Mustang CART PPG pace car
2005 Dodge Magnum by Roush
collection floor
Boss 604 Mustang SVC
Roush Ford Taurus Matt Kenseth Daytona 500 winner
1968 Mercury Cougar GTE 427 CID
Roush NASCAR Ford Taurus Kurt Busch
1983 Thunderbird CART PPG pace car
1929 Ford Model A Roadster Pickup
Fusion 999 Hyrdogen racer
Ford Indigo roadster concept

Cunningham prototype

Roush Folgers NASCAR Thunderbird Mark Martin

dinner is served

1951 Ford Victoria hardtop

Mustang IMSA GTP

1934 Ford Bohnalite Indy racer recreation

1967 Cougar

1988 Merkur Roush IMSA racer

Big Thunder Falcon NMRA drag car

Roush IRS road racing chassis

Ford Model T Speedster

Roush Pontiac G6

Chad Little Roush NASCAR Thunderbird John Deere

Ford 600 tractor

Boss 604 Mustang

Roush SCCA Spec Racer Ford

Roush Zakspeed Mustang Probe IMSA GT

Roush NASCAR Ford Fusion Irwin Jamie McMurray

Mustang CART PPG pace car

2005 Dodge Magnum by Roush

collection floor

Boss 604 Mustang SVC

Roush Ford Taurus Matt Kenseth Daytona 500 winner

1968 Mercury Cougar GTE 427 CID

Roush NASCAR Ford Taurus Kurt Busch

1983 Thunderbird CART PPG pace car

1929 Ford Model A Roadster Pickup

Fusion 999 Hyrdogen racer

Ford Indigo roadster concept

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7 thoughts on “A visit to the Jack Roush Collection

  1. I like this collection. Jack seems to have some interest in normal everyday cars rather than the usual exotic muscle car collection.

  2. Ford-heavy for obvious reasons. He worked for Ford at the peak of the muscle car era and has been racing them for at least thirty years. His connections probably get him fantastic deals. I just hope he’s a better driver than pilot.

    Rick Hendrick has been fielding race cars just as long but hasn’t ventured outside of NASCAR for very long and wasn’t as successful. It’s been a while since I’ve seen his collection but it wasn’t as diverse. Probably no tractors or cars from the Twenties. At that time, Rick liked the high-dollar Barrett-Jackson cars, the 1 of 1 COPO cars and such. But he’s certainly no GM loyalist. He owns dealerships for at least 14 manufacturers. An equal amount of Toyotas as Chevy, and twice as many Honda.

    I don’t understand why we haven’t seen any big collections of Japanese cars. There’s no doubt that they’ve ruled the American landscape since the Eighties. Granted, there haven’t been many high-horsepower sports cars but the Honda Civic was as revolutionary in its time as the Model T, and may be the modern version of the street rodder’s 55 Chevy. The RX7 and 240Z are as iconic as an E Type Jaguar. The Miata is every low-buck British sports car wrapped into one.

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